macad.uk Advanced Munki links

Here are the collected links from today’s “Advanced Munki” presentation at the MACAD conference in London (http://www.macad.uk):

Munki: https://github.com/munki/munki
Unattended installs: https://github.com/munki/munki/wiki/Pkginfo-Files#unattended-installs-and-uninstalls
Force install after date: https://github.com/munki/munki/wiki/Pkginfo-Files#force-install-after-date
Apple Update Metadata: https://github.com/munki/munki/wiki/Pkginfo-For-Apple-Software-Updates
Conditional items: https://github.com/munki/munki/wiki/Conditional-Items
Admin-provided conditions: https://github.com/munki/munki/wiki/Conditional-Items#admin-provided-conditions
Pre- and Post-install scripting: https://github.com/munki/munki/wiki/Pre-And-Postinstall-Scripts
Bootstrapping with Munki: https://github.com/munki/munki/wiki/Pre-And-Postinstall-Scripts
Configuration Profiles with Munki: https://github.com/munki/munki/wiki/Managing-Configuration-Profiles
Desktop picture profile template: https://github.com/gregneagle/profiles/blob/master/desktop_picture.mobileconfig
On-Demand items: Not much documentation yet! But… https://groups.google.com/d/topic/munki-dev/KW9OeH4jtYI/discussion
Customizing the GUI: https://github.com/munki/munki/wiki/Client-Customization

macad.uk Advanced Munki links

Flash Player 20 and Analytics

Flash Player 10Flash Player was a frequent topic on this blog in the past. But Adobe has improved its packaging, and tools like AutoPkg have taken away much of the pain around deploying frequent Flash Player updates.

Yesterday, Adobe released Flash Player 20. A new addition is an executable at /Library/Application Support/Adobe/FPFeedbackService. Poking at this executable using strings makes it clear the tool reports analytics back to Adobe.

Some fine people on the MacAdmins Slack channel poked at it some more with Hopper and determined it can be turned off by adding DisableAnalytics=1 to a configuration file at /Library/Application Support/Macromedia/mms.cfg.

If you wish to disable Flash analytics in your fleet, then, one approach would be to install a properly configured mms.cfg file. The https://github.com/munki/munki-pkg-projects repo has a project you can use to build such a package: https://github.com/munki/munki-pkg-projects/tree/master/AdobeFlashConfiguration

The AdobeFlashConfiguration project is designed for use with the munki-pkg tool.

More info on Flash analytics here: https://osxbytes.wordpress.com/2015/12/09/flash-player-20-0-0-235-adds-phone-home-analytics/

Flash Player 20 and Analytics

Slides and links from MacTech Conference Packaging Lab

Thanks to all who participated in the Packaging Lab yesterday at MacTech Conference.

Copies of the slides are available here.

Some other (hopefully) helpful links:

The Luggage:

AutoPkg:

MunkiPkg:

Slides and links from MacTech Conference Packaging Lab

Packaging Lab at MacTech Conference 2015

If you are planning on participating in the Packaging Lab this week at the MacTech Conference, you may want to download some materials in advance when you aren’t competing with all the other people for limited conference Wi-Fi bandwidth. Note — don’t install these items — just download their installers and keep them handy for the lab.

ExifTool pkg:
http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool/ExifTool-10.03.dmg

Adobe Reader 11 pkg:
http://ardownload.adobe.com/pub/adobe/reader/mac/11.x/11.0.10/en_US/AdbeRdr11010_en_US.dmg

Google Earth pkg:
http://dl.google.com/earth/client/advanced/current/GoogleEarthMacNoUpdate-Intel.dmg

Firefox dmg:
http://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/firefox/releases/latest/mac/en-US/Firefox%2042.0.dmg

Google Chrome dmg:
https://dl.google.com/chrome/mac/stable/GGRO/googlechrome.dmg

Some optional things:

Packages:
http://s.sudre.free.fr/Software/files/Packages.dmg

Suspicious Package:
http://www.mothersruin.com/software/SuspiciousPackage/download.html

Pacifist:
https://www.charlessoft.com

Packaging Lab at MacTech Conference 2015

Preference Management with Profiles links

Here are links to some of the tools and resources I mention today in my MacSysAdmin 2015 presentation, Preference Management with Profiles:

mcxToProfile: https://github.com/timsutton/mcxToProfile

make-profile-pkg: https://github.com/timsutton/make-profile-pkg

Profile Manager (Server 4): https://help.apple.com/serverapp/mac/4.0/index.html?localePath=en.lproj#apd0E2214C6-50F0-48C9-A482-74CEA1D77A9F

Profile Manager (Server 5): https://help.apple.com/serverapp/mac/5.0/index.html?localePath=en.lproj#apd0E2214C6-50F0-48C9-A482-74CEA1D77A9F

Configuration Profile reference: https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/featuredarticles/iPhoneConfigurationProfileRef/Introduction/Introduction.html

Preference Management with Profiles links

Using autopkg for “general purpose” packaging

A few days ago I made a simple tool for building packages available: munkipkg.

https://github.com/munki/munki-pkg

I got many comments and suggestions for additional features and all sorts of cool additions. Some have even been added to the tool already. But I would like to keep munkipkg a pretty simple, basic tool.

The Luggage (https://github.com/unixorn/luggage) has been around for a while; if munkipkg is too simple for your needs, please have look at that.

I also suggested to several people that if they had more complex needs than munkipkg could handle, it might make more sense to use autopkg, which supports very complex, customizable workflows.

I could tell by the awkward silence that my suggestion was confusing to some — that they had trouble grokking how to use autopkg to build packages “from scratch”, using files and scripts on the local disk.

So I created a GitHub repo demonstrating how to use autopkg in this manner. It’s here: https://github.com/gregneagle/autopkg-packaging-demo

munkipkg comes with three demo package projects. Two of the packages install files, the third is a “payload-free” package that simply runs a script when installed. The autopkg-packaging-demo duplicates these packages, but uses autopkg to build them instead of munkipkg.

(One could also imagine building these packages using either tool: the payload and scripts directories would be the same — in other words, you could have both a build-info.plist for munkipkg and a recipe for autopkg in the same package project directory.)

Assuming you have autopkg installed, you can `git clone` the repo, or download and expand the zip file, and run the autopkg recipes within.

I hope this clears up some confusion, and sparks some new ideas!

Using autopkg for “general purpose” packaging

Introducing munkipkg

https://github.com/munki/munki-pkg

munkipkg is a simple tool for building packages in a consistent, repeatable manner from source files and scripts in a project directory.

Files, scripts, and metadata are stored in a way that is easy to track and manage using a version control system like git.

Another tool that solves a similar problem is Joe Block’s The Luggage (https://github.com/unixorn/luggage). If you are happily using The Luggage, you can probably safely ignore this tool.

Though this tool may eventually be added to the set of tools installed with the Munki command-line tools, it’s not currently tied to Munki and can be run completely standalone.

Learn more here.

Introducing munkipkg